Control and Anger – Part II

I can control all of these factors, but I will become angry or less angry, or have other negative emotions in greater or lesser amounts when these expectations are not met, depending upon my conscious understanding of the subtleties of my expectations. In this case the need has a shorter cycle than the want, hence is more imperative. Fortunately, expectations can better be understood when we think of them as being either want based, or need based. In short, they and our reactions to them can be modified when you understand these critical aspects. Doing this neutralizes the impact of an unmet expectation. Doing this puts me firmly in control of my emotional reactions.

This is the second of a series of articles on control and anger. Please read the previous article (Part I) before reading this one. To continue with the discussion of wants vs. needs…
I can control all of these factors, but I will become angry or less angry, or have other negative emotions in greater or lesser amounts when these expectations are not met, depending upon my conscious understanding of the subtleties of my expectations. In this case the need has a shorter cycle than the want, hence is more imperative.

Continue reading “Control and Anger – Part II”

Cognitive Techniques for Anger Management – Part I

Here’s some cognitive techniques for anger management. Reduce your expectations by choice. Expect less and enjoy more. This is a decision, not a reaction. You are not turning off your reactivity, just changing how many reactions you need or want, and what makes you happier or not when you do. You have control over this, even if you are not used to thinking this way. Try it, and then practice. For example, try to not be so attached to what you think is right or wrong. While there are exceptions (traffic laws), most things in your life are not life and death, so you don’t need to over-react.

Here’s some cognitive techniques for anger management. Reduce your expectations by choice. Expect less and enjoy more. This is a decision, not a reaction. You are not turning off your reactivity, just changing how many reactions you need or want, and what makes you happier or not when you do. You have control over this, even if you are not used to thinking this way. Try it, and then practice. For example, try to not be so attached to what you think is right or wrong. While there are exceptions (traffic laws), most things in your life are not life and death, so you don’t need to over-react. Continue reading “Cognitive Techniques for Anger Management – Part I”

AN ANALYSIS OF MALE AND FEMALE SUSPECTED OFFENDERS OF INTIMATE PARTNER HOMICIDE

The purpose of this study was to identify and compare the differences and similarities between male and female suspected offenders of intimate partner homicide (IPH). The California Vital Statistics and Homicide Data [CVSHD], 1990-1999 (Jason, 2002), was used for this study. The CVSHD contains data from victims of homicide in California from 1990 to 1999. The understanding of intimate partner violence and intimate partner homicide were explored using four different theoretical approaches. Consistent with previous research, the results of this study suggest that suspected offenders involved in the killing of an intimate partner are more likely to be male.

The purpose of this study was to identify and compare the differences and similarities between male and female suspected offenders of intimate partner homicide (IPH). The California Vital Statistics and Homicide Data [CVSHD], 1990-1999 (Jason, 2002), was used for this study. The CVSHD contains data from victims of homicide in California from 1990 to 1999. The understanding of intimate partner violence and intimate partner homicide were explored using four different theoretical approaches. Consistent with previous research, the results of this study suggest that suspected offenders involved in the killing of an intimate partner are more likely to be male. Continue reading “AN ANALYSIS OF MALE AND FEMALE SUSPECTED OFFENDERS OF INTIMATE PARTNER HOMICIDE”

Age Differential and Marital Status between Partners as Risk Factors for Domestic Violence and Child Abuse

Having worked for several years in child protective services (CPS), I was often assigned to cases in which domestic violence played a central role and I was called to assess the potential risk to the children. Many of the cases involved relationships where the male partner was younger than the female partner, and the couple’s marital status was identified as boyfriend/girlfriend in most of those cases.

Having worked for several years in child protective services (CPS), I was often assigned to cases in which domestic violence played a central role and I was called to assess the potential risk to the children. Many of the cases involved relationships where the male partner was younger than the female partner, and the couple’s marital status was identified as boyfriend/girlfriend in most of those cases. Continue reading “Age Differential and Marital Status between Partners as Risk Factors for Domestic Violence and Child Abuse”