AN ANALYSIS OF MALE AND FEMALE SUSPECTED OFFENDERS OF INTIMATE PARTNER HOMICIDE

The purpose of this study was to identify and compare the differences and similarities between male and female suspected offenders of intimate partner homicide (IPH). The California Vital Statistics and Homicide Data [CVSHD], 1990-1999 (Jason, 2002), was used for this study. The CVSHD contains data from victims of homicide in California from 1990 to 1999. The understanding of intimate partner violence and intimate partner homicide were explored using four different theoretical approaches. Consistent with previous research, the results of this study suggest that suspected offenders involved in the killing of an intimate partner are more likely to be male.

The purpose of this study was to identify and compare the differences and similarities between male and female suspected offenders of intimate partner homicide (IPH). The California Vital Statistics and Homicide Data [CVSHD], 1990-1999 (Jason, 2002), was used for this study. The CVSHD contains data from victims of homicide in California from 1990 to 1999. The understanding of intimate partner violence and intimate partner homicide were explored using four different theoretical approaches. Consistent with previous research, the results of this study suggest that suspected offenders involved in the killing of an intimate partner are more likely to be male.

The results also indicate that IPH is for the most part a male-to-female and female-to-male event. The primary weapons of choice used to perpetrate the intimate partner homicide by both genders were handguns, but women were more likely than men to use knives or other kind of stabbing instrument. Based on population percentages, it was determined that those identified as boyfriend/girlfriend were at the highest risk for IPH. Secondly, African-Americans were found to be overrepresented as both suspected offenders and victims of IPH.

African-American females were more likely to be the offenders compared to African-American males. This study was concluded by discussing the implications of these findings, and by identifying several areas for future research, including the effects separation and legal divorce may have on intimate partner homicide.

This link will take you to the full study (more than 90 pages long). The file is a PDF file.

This study is indexed by The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR). ICPSR is part of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. ICPSR is the world’s largest archive of digital social science data.

Written by Julio Reyna, Psy.D.

Initially posted on 10/03/2006

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